#MonsterMovieMonday: Song at Midnight (1937) – China’s Phantom of the Opera

Ho-wdy, Phantom Phans!

Just another #MonsterMonday here at Kinky Ho-rror. This week, we’re bringing you a phantom of a very different opera. From Paris to China, it’s time for a fright at the opera with Song at Midnight!

Perhaps the most underrated film we’ve ever featured on #MonsterMovieMondays, Song at Midnight is one of the best interpretations of Gaston LerouXXX;s Phantom of the Opera. It’s often called the first Chinese horror film and it is the first time an opera phantom was scarred by acid, a plot element that would be recycled for many future adaptations. While virtually unknown in North America, Song At Midnight seems to be a beloved classic in China. With four films and a TV series based on this movie, it’s clear that this particular Phantom won’t stay dead, even if he still dwells in the shadows.


Don’t eXXXpect any crashing chandeliers or Red Death appearances; this is an entirely different Phantom. An acting troupe arrives at a abandoned theater that is said to be haunted by the spectre of Song Danping, a famous opera singer. Sun Xiao-au, a young male singer hears the ghostly voice Song Danping, who takes Sun on as his protege. Donning an ominous black robe, Song appears before Sun and reveals the shocking truth of his past to the young performer.


Song at Midnight
combines romance, Universal-style ho-rror, and political themes to form a truly unique ’30s monster movie experience. Hauntingly beautiful and EXXXpressionistically eerie, Song at Midnight is perfect ho-rror fairy tale for those who love the Universal Gothics and are inclined to root for the monster. Filled with cl-ass-ic monster movie imagery, tragic monsters, ghostly happenings, and spookshow theatrics, this old-fashioned Gothic tale is perfect for the creepiest time of the year.

Plus, check out that Phantom! Ho-ly crap, that’s awesome!

Click on the boXXX below to experience the Song at Midnight:

#MonsterMovieMonday: Nightmare Castle (1965)

Ho-wdy, Kinky Kreeps!

Just another #MonsterMonday here at Kinky Ho-rror! This week, we’re worshiping at the Crimson Altar of the High Priestess of Gothic Ho-rror, Barbara Steele!

Ms. Steele is, without a doubt, THE Queen of cl-Ass-Sick Ho-rror Cinema. Her piercing eyes, her haunting presence, her ghost-like grace…Barbara always looked like she was about to Steele your soul! No coffin could hold her and no force on Earth could stop her! She held her own against the likes of Vincent Price, Boris Karloff, Christopher Lee, and Barnabas Collins! Both ho-rror heroine and ho-rrific monster, Steele is a true fright icon.

Today’s terror tale is Nightmare Castle and it features Goddess Steele at her most frightful. The Gothic Queen does double duty as both the doe-eyed Jenny and the ghostly Muriel… and kills it as both!

It’s an old-fashioned sort of story: castles, romance, and… ghosts! A cozy little tale that’s just perfect for this most ghoulish of seasons. With mad science, fiendish torture, surreal nightmares, and an Ennio Morricone score that sounds like it was composed by The Phantom of the Opera, this is film is pure Gothic bliss. And if Steele’s creeptacular performance doesn’t frighten you, you’re already dead!
Do you dare spend the night at… Nightmare Castle?!

Happy #MonsterMovieMonday, Kreeps!! 🙂

#FrankensteinFriday: Tales of Frankenstein (1958)

“From the beginning of time, many men have sought the unknown, delving into dark regions, where lie those truths, which are destined to destroy him.

Of all these eerie adventurers into darkness, none was more driven by insatiable curiosity, nor went further into the unknown than the unforgettable Baron Frankenstein.

“So infamous were his exploits that his name stands forever as a symbol of all that is shocking, unspeakable, forbidden. Thus, in our day, many a story, which chills the soul and freezes the blood, is truly a tale of Frankenstein.

“Now, join us in the mystery, the excitement, and the stimulation that comes when we tell a story so weird, so dark, so harrowing, that it deserves to be called one of the many TALES OF FRANKENSTEIN.

Ho-wdy, Franken-Homies!

Stop.

It’s Hammer Time here at Kinky Ho-rror! 😉 We’re resurrecting another patchwork corpse-creature from the Hammer House of Ho-rror! From 1958, it’s…

Ho-ping to scare up some recognition in the States, Hammer teamed up Columbia Pictures with the intent of creating 26 electrifying episodes of Franken-stories, with each studio handling 13. Howl-ever, the two studios couldn’t agree on what parts to stitch on and the whole thing fell apart.

Hammer wanted the series to be made in the same style as their Curse of Frankenstein, Columbia owned the TV rights to the Universal films and wanted to use that version. The resulting pilot has elements of both, with Anton “The Man Who Could Cheat Death” Diffring as a Cushing-like Baron Frankenstein and Don “The Creature Walks Among Us” Megowan as a flat-headed monster. Legendary Universal screenwriter Curt Siodmak directed the film in the style of a ’40s monster chiller.

This one’s a must-see for Franken-fans! It’s got chills and thrills for both fans of Hammer and cl-Ass-Sick Universal fright fare! Anton Diffring is a wonderful stand-in for Peter Cushing and the Monster’s real groovy! It really is a shame that this series didn’t get picked up, but what we have is shockingly good!

Do you dare face the challenge of Tales of Frankenstein?!

Happy #FrankenFriday, Kinky Ho-mies!! 🙂 xoxo

#MonsterMovieMonday: Killers From Space

Ho-wdy, Kinky Kreeps! I SEE you there!

Just another #MonsterMonday here at Kinky Ho-rror! This week, we’re spacing out with a sci-fi screamer that’ll make your eyes pop! Jeepers Creepers! It’s the peepers of…

Killers from Space is real eye-opener from W. Lee Wilder, brother of the brilliant Billy Wilder! Sure, W. Lee didn’t direct Some Like It Hot, but…

The film stars Peter “Mission: Impossible” Graves as a scientist killed in plane crash who is resurrected by bug-eyed aliens. The saucer-eyed fiends plan to exterminate humanity using giant animals and take over the world…

This one’s a doozy! Featuring the biggest eyes in ho-rror since Peter Lorre, atomic monsters, and terrifying stock footage, Killers From Space is awesome B-movie nonsense to make your Monday monstrous! If it’s good enough for It Follows, it’s good enough for us! 🙂

Killers From Space in It Follows

Stare into the eyes of Killers From Space below:

#MonsterMovieMonday: Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1920)

Hyde-y Ho, Ho-rror Ho-mies!
Just another Monster Monday here at Kinky Ho-rror, so who’s up for a game of Hyde-and-Shriek…? 😉
Today’s featured creature feature is 1920’s Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, starring John Barrymore as the two-faced fiend. It is one of the earliest (but not THE earliest) adaptation of Robert Louis Stevenson’s cl-Ass-sick terror tale of Good and Evil. For our blood money, the 1931 version is BY FAR the best take on the story. Howl-ever, we think this film doesn’t get enough of the ol’ mad love.
For starters, John Barrymore does a sensational job as the tit-ular fiend(s). His first transformation is done completely without makeup, so it’s just Barrymore contorting his features and violently jerking about, turning himself into a monster through sheer body language… and dam if it ain’t creepy as all heck! When he does get all decked out in fright gear, Barrymore is a thing from Hell!
This gaslight Gothic’s also gotta a lot of dread and menace, with atmos-fear as thick as a London fog. For something creeping up on a hundred years, it’s still got the fright stuff, baby! Our favorite bit is a nightmare sequence with a spider creature that has to be seen to be feared! In silent films, no one can hear you scream!

Nowhere to Hyde… check out the film below!

#MonsterMovieMonday: The Brain That Wouldn’t Die

Ho-wdy, Ho-rror Headhunters, and Happy Slay-borday!! 😉 It’s another #MonsterMovieMonday here at Kinky Ho-rror, so we’re serving up a head-y dose of cranial creepiness with a cl-Ass-Sick fright film called…

Y’know, most scientists have a pretty good head on their shoulders… but Dr. Bill Cortner has an even better one in a pan!

At least, he has ever since his fiance, Jan, lost her head in a most literal sense. Using some of that ol’ mad science, he keeps her head alive and searches for a new body for his bride-to-be. Howl-ever, Jan-in-the-Pan is less than thrilled with her body-less existence, so she calls upon a literal monster in the closet to help her get revenge. If all that sounds weird, it’s only because it is.

Yessiree. Kinky Kreeps… this one’s a favorite o’ mine. Some call it “So Bad, it’s Good”, I call it an eccentric cl-Ass-Sick. Audacious, delightfully sleazy, and weird all over… this one’s unforgettable! There’s plenty o’ gratuitous cheesecake and some fairly strong gore for its time. And in its own goofy way, the film is a pretty engaging sci-fi melodrama. It boasts some pretty good camerawork and a strong central performance from Virginia Leith as the fiend without a body. As far as insane B-movies go, this one’s a-head of the curve.]Use your head… check out this freaky fright film below! 🙂 xoxo

Bride of #WerewolfWednesday: My Mom’s a Werewolf (1989)

“I am a werewolf, and I need a were-wife.”

Howl-dy, Wolf Weirdos!

Since Ol’ Mr. Goony Goon just gave ya an ’80s comedy ho-wler, I thought I’d CREEP the theme going with My Mom’s a Werewolf, a 1989 lycanthrope laugh lark… starring Susan Blakely, Diana “Jason’s 60th Victim” Burrows, and John Saxon!

My Mom’s a Werewolf tells the tales of a housewife (Susan Blakely) who is bitten on the toe by a werewolf (John Saxon), thus beginning her transformation into a monster.

Guest Director: Quentin Tarantino

Once she discovers her condition she tries to conceal her secret from her husband and daughter… with hilarious(?) results. When her secret is revealed, the woman’s daughter and her ho-rror-obsessed friend must find a cure… before it’s too late.
Ok, so this film is not good, but it’s a watchable kind of “not good”. John Saxon is a credible-enough werewolf and most of the cast is fun.  The whole affair is aglow with the neon brilliance of the 1980s and loaded with some eXXXcellent Ho-rror references. Keep an eye out for Forrest J. Ackerman at a Ho-rror convention.

Personally, I think think this goofy little film is…
Check out the ’80s were-madness below:

#TerrorTuesday: Terror is a Man (1958)

Ho-wdy, Manimals!


It’s the most gruesome day in the week… #TerrorTuesday! Please do not panic… but SCREAM! Scream for your lives!!!
We’re going to the animals this week with Terror is a Man, a 1958 fright film from the Philippines. It concerns a mad scientist (of corpse ;)) whose ghastly, island-based eXXXperiments transform a panther into a fantastical Panther Man. Guess he’s a Carolina fan. #GOPANTHERS!! #KEEPPOUNDING!! 😉
You savvy ho-rror ho-unds may notice a certain resemblance to ho-rror classic The Island of Dr. Moreau. While it’s not an official retelling of the story, it’s a kreepy kewl take on the basic concept. It’s moody, spooky, and has a PURRRfect cat-creep. The only thing that’s missing is Marlon Brando and his Mini-Me.
Take a trip to Blood Island below:

Keep it Kinky, Kreeps! 🙂 xoxo

#WerewolfWednesday: Werewolf of Washington (1973)

E Pluribus Lupus, Monster Mashers!

It’s another wild ‘n’ weird Werewolf Wednesday here at Kinky Ho-rror! For this week’s hairy ho-wler, we’re taking to the home of history’s most ho-rrifying monsters: Washington D.C.

Werewolf of Washington is today’s chiller-diller and, boy, is it some-THING! Part Monster Movie! Part Political Satire! All Terror!
The film stars Dean Stockwell, sans green hair. He plays White House Press Secretary Jack Whitter, a man cursed with lycanthropy…  Oh, boy.
This film probably isn’t going to give you nightmares, but I don’t think it’s really supposed to. It’s clear that this film was intended to be a commentary on the NiXXXon era. Can you imagine how-l much better All the President’s Men would be if it starred the Wolfman?
Ho-wever, that doesn’t mean there ain’t some prime werewolf terror! When the hairy one shows up, it’s classic B-movie madness! While it’s certainly no Jack Pierce monsterpiece, the make-up is pretty groovy. That’s certainly something to howl about.
Keep America strong… watch Werewolf of Washington below:

#MonsterMovieMonday: Night of the Living Dead (1968)

Dedicated to George A. Romero. xoxo

Ho-wdy, Flesh Eaters! 😉

Just another #MonsterMonday here at KH, so let’s wake the dead with one of the undeniable cl-ass-sicks of the ho-rror genre. If it doesn’t scare you, you’re already dead! From 1968, It’s…
This one’s huge (hehe ;))…It’s the ultimate zombie movie; often imitated, but never duplicated. The late, great George A. Romero did what few have done and essentially created a new genre of monster fiction. Yes, Haitian/voodoo zombies eXXXisted before (and are still awesome as heck), but Romero’s film created the shambling, flesh-eating corpses we know and fear today. Without this film, there is no Return of the Living Dead, The Walking Dead, or Shaun of the Dead.
Night of the Living Dead was unleashed nearly 50 years ago, but it still has the power to get under your skin. Its shoestring budget only adds to the nightmarish nature of the film. With perfect dread and an ending that still galvanizes, this is one of the monster films that will never truly die. George A. Romero is the true King of the Zombies.
Check out this masterpiece below: