#MonsterMovieMonday: Song at Midnight (1937) – China’s Phantom of the Opera

Ho-wdy, Phantom Phans!

Just another #MonsterMonday here at Kinky Ho-rror. This week, we’re bringing you a phantom of a very different opera. From Paris to China, it’s time for a fright at the opera with Song at Midnight!

Perhaps the most underrated film we’ve ever featured on #MonsterMovieMondays, Song at Midnight is one of the best interpretations of Gaston LerouXXX;s Phantom of the Opera. It’s often called the first Chinese horror film and it is the first time an opera phantom was scarred by acid, a plot element that would be recycled for many future adaptations. While virtually unknown in North America, Song At Midnight seems to be a beloved classic in China. With four films and a TV series based on this movie, it’s clear that this particular Phantom won’t stay dead, even if he still dwells in the shadows.


Don’t eXXXpect any crashing chandeliers or Red Death appearances; this is an entirely different Phantom. An acting troupe arrives at a abandoned theater that is said to be haunted by the spectre of Song Danping, a famous opera singer. Sun Xiao-au, a young male singer hears the ghostly voice Song Danping, who takes Sun on as his protege. Donning an ominous black robe, Song appears before Sun and reveals the shocking truth of his past to the young performer.


Song at Midnight
combines romance, Universal-style ho-rror, and political themes to form a truly unique ’30s monster movie experience. Hauntingly beautiful and EXXXpressionistically eerie, Song at Midnight is perfect ho-rror fairy tale for those who love the Universal Gothics and are inclined to root for the monster. Filled with cl-ass-ic monster movie imagery, tragic monsters, ghostly happenings, and spookshow theatrics, this old-fashioned Gothic tale is perfect for the creepiest time of the year.

Plus, check out that Phantom! Ho-ly crap, that’s awesome!

Click on the boXXX below to experience the Song at Midnight:

#MonsterMovieMonday: Killers From Space

Ho-wdy, Kinky Kreeps! I SEE you there!

Just another #MonsterMonday here at Kinky Ho-rror! This week, we’re spacing out with a sci-fi screamer that’ll make your eyes pop! Jeepers Creepers! It’s the peepers of…

Killers from Space is real eye-opener from W. Lee Wilder, brother of the brilliant Billy Wilder! Sure, W. Lee didn’t direct Some Like It Hot, but…

The film stars Peter “Mission: Impossible” Graves as a scientist killed in plane crash who is resurrected by bug-eyed aliens. The saucer-eyed fiends plan to exterminate humanity using giant animals and take over the world…

This one’s a doozy! Featuring the biggest eyes in ho-rror since Peter Lorre, atomic monsters, and terrifying stock footage, Killers From Space is awesome B-movie nonsense to make your Monday monstrous! If it’s good enough for It Follows, it’s good enough for us! 🙂

Killers From Space in It Follows

Stare into the eyes of Killers From Space below:

#MonsterMovieMonday: Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1920)

Hyde-y Ho, Ho-rror Ho-mies!
Just another Monster Monday here at Kinky Ho-rror, so who’s up for a game of Hyde-and-Shriek…? 😉
Today’s featured creature feature is 1920’s Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, starring John Barrymore as the two-faced fiend. It is one of the earliest (but not THE earliest) adaptation of Robert Louis Stevenson’s cl-Ass-sick terror tale of Good and Evil. For our blood money, the 1931 version is BY FAR the best take on the story. Howl-ever, we think this film doesn’t get enough of the ol’ mad love.
For starters, John Barrymore does a sensational job as the tit-ular fiend(s). His first transformation is done completely without makeup, so it’s just Barrymore contorting his features and violently jerking about, turning himself into a monster through sheer body language… and dam if it ain’t creepy as all heck! When he does get all decked out in fright gear, Barrymore is a thing from Hell!
This gaslight Gothic’s also gotta a lot of dread and menace, with atmos-fear as thick as a London fog. For something creeping up on a hundred years, it’s still got the fright stuff, baby! Our favorite bit is a nightmare sequence with a spider creature that has to be seen to be feared! In silent films, no one can hear you scream!

Nowhere to Hyde… check out the film below!

#MonsterMovieMonday: The Brain That Wouldn’t Die

Ho-wdy, Ho-rror Headhunters, and Happy Slay-borday!! 😉 It’s another #MonsterMovieMonday here at Kinky Ho-rror, so we’re serving up a head-y dose of cranial creepiness with a cl-Ass-Sick fright film called…

Y’know, most scientists have a pretty good head on their shoulders… but Dr. Bill Cortner has an even better one in a pan!

At least, he has ever since his fiance, Jan, lost her head in a most literal sense. Using some of that ol’ mad science, he keeps her head alive and searches for a new body for his bride-to-be. Howl-ever, Jan-in-the-Pan is less than thrilled with her body-less existence, so she calls upon a literal monster in the closet to help her get revenge. If all that sounds weird, it’s only because it is.

Yessiree. Kinky Kreeps… this one’s a favorite o’ mine. Some call it “So Bad, it’s Good”, I call it an eccentric cl-Ass-Sick. Audacious, delightfully sleazy, and weird all over… this one’s unforgettable! There’s plenty o’ gratuitous cheesecake and some fairly strong gore for its time. And in its own goofy way, the film is a pretty engaging sci-fi melodrama. It boasts some pretty good camerawork and a strong central performance from Virginia Leith as the fiend without a body. As far as insane B-movies go, this one’s a-head of the curve.]Use your head… check out this freaky fright film below! 🙂 xoxo

#MonsterMovieMonday: Creature from the Haunted Sea

Ho-wdy, Monster Mashers!


Today’s fright fest is a creepy cheapie from the King of the Bs, Roger Corman. It’s a MAD Magazine mash-up of monsters and mobsters known as…
Creature from the Haunted Sea is the third in a series of funny fright films Corman produced in the late ’50s and early ’60s, the previous two being  A Bucket of Blood (1959) and The Little Shop of Horrors (1960). While those brilliantly bloody burlesques are seen as B-movie masterworks, Creature has dwelled in relative obscurity for decades now. The advertising sold the film as a straight Ho-rror picture, which it certainly is not. Naturally, the film pissed of a lot of creep-seekers and the film did poorly.  That’s a shame, because this a pretty groovy Ho-rror comedy.
Okay, so it ain’t the most hilarious film ever made and it didn’t spawn a musical remake with Rick “King of Kings” Moranis, but it’s stuffed with quirky ideas and a deliberate goofiness. Its combination of spy spoof, crime comedy, and Ho-rror humor is very much of its time, but that only makes it serve as a goofy sort of time capsule. Plus, it has one of the greatest goofball monsters of all time…
Ho-ly crap! That’s what happens when you don’t give Cookie Monster a cookie!

Do you dare face the “terror” of… The Creature from the Haunted Sea?!

#MonsterMovieMonday: The Crimson Ghost

Ho-wdy, Kinky Ho-mies!

A very scary Monster Movie Monday to all you creeps and creatures! In an effort to make your day as ho-rrifying as possible, we’ve got a Serial Thriller for ya! This one’s a gas… poisonous gas, that is! From the fiends over at Republic, it’s…
The Crimson Ghost was unleashed upon the world in 1946 and still haunts us to this very day. Its tit-ular ghoul has been called one of the most visually striking serial villains, with his flowing robes and spookshow skeleton mask. The serial revolves around the villain’s attempts  to steal a counter atomic device known as Cyclotrode X, which can short out any electrical device…Shocking, isn’t it? 😉
Since his initial apperance, The Crimson Ghost has become something of a rock icon.  He’s been the official mascot of The Misfits for many moons now and appeared in the video for Iron Maiden’s The Number of the Beast. Because of his ass-ociation with the Devil’s Mu-sick, The Crimson Ghost has become one of the most beloved ghouls in the history of the serial. Rock on, Crimson One!

They see me rollin’, they hatin’…

Here they are… All 12 Chapters of The Crimson Ghost! Can your heart withstand such terror?!

Stay Kreepy, Kreeps!

#MonsterMovieMonday: Night of the Living Dead (1968)

Dedicated to George A. Romero. xoxo

Ho-wdy, Flesh Eaters! 😉

Just another #MonsterMonday here at KH, so let’s wake the dead with one of the undeniable cl-ass-sicks of the ho-rror genre. If it doesn’t scare you, you’re already dead! From 1968, It’s…
This one’s huge (hehe ;))…It’s the ultimate zombie movie; often imitated, but never duplicated. The late, great George A. Romero did what few have done and essentially created a new genre of monster fiction. Yes, Haitian/voodoo zombies eXXXisted before (and are still awesome as heck), but Romero’s film created the shambling, flesh-eating corpses we know and fear today. Without this film, there is no Return of the Living Dead, The Walking Dead, or Shaun of the Dead.
Night of the Living Dead was unleashed nearly 50 years ago, but it still has the power to get under your skin. Its shoestring budget only adds to the nightmarish nature of the film. With perfect dread and an ending that still galvanizes, this is one of the monster films that will never truly die. George A. Romero is the true King of the Zombies.
Check out this masterpiece below:

#MonsterMovieMonday: The Wasp Woman (1959)

“I’d stay away from wasps if i were you, Mrs. Starlin. Socially the queen wasp is on the level with a Black Widow spider. They’re both carnivorous, they paralyze their victims and then take their time devouring them alive. And they kill their mates in the same way, too. Strictly a one-sided romance.”

Ho-wdy, Monster Maniacs!

We’re just buzzing with eXXXcitement about today’s creature feature! It’s a stinging work of terror from the King of the Bs, Mr. Roger Corman!  Can your heart withstand the shocking ho-rror of…
Released in 1959, The Wasp Woman tells the story of Janice Starlin, played by Susan Cabot. Ms. Starlin is the founder, owner, and spokeswoman for a large cosmetics company. When her company’s sales begin to plummet, her aging appearance is blamed for their decline. In a desperate attempt to appear young, she becomes the willing guinea pig for an eXXXperiment that uses the jelly of the queen wasp to reverse the aging process. Of corpse, it goes wrong and we’re treated to some cl-ass-sick monster madness!
Okay, so the plot’s a little groan-worthy (feminist, it ain’t) and it’s more than a little goofy, but this film is a really groovy creepy cheapie. Susan Cabot is actually pretty compelling as the were-insect, and the rest of cast is good(ish ;)). It’s been called one of the “worst movies ever,” but that’s hardly fair. While I do wish it had more of the tit-ular creature, what we do see is spooky stuff. Bonus points for Susan Cabot actually being in the mask!
Feel the sting of The Wasp Woman below:

SIDE NOTE: We also rec checking out the 1995 remake with the dreamiest of Dream Warriors, the incomparable Ms. Jennifer Rubin. 🙂 xoxo

#MonsterMovieMonday: White Zombie (1932)

Just another Monster Movie Monday here at Kinky Horror, and this one’s a real clas-sick. We’re going all the way back to 1932 disturb the dead and resurrect… White Zombie!

White Zombie is a personal favorite o’ mine and is one of the finest fright flicks to rise from the public domain. It stars Bela “Bringing SeXXXy Drac” Lugosi as Murder Legendre, who is certainly no traditional bokor, but knows how to get the dead movin’. He’s hired by Charles Beaumont (not the Twilight Zone one) to work his wicked witchcraft, although, he knows, it’s strictly taboo. Ol’ Charlie wants him to make the beautiful Madeline his wife, so Murder makes her a zombie! However, Charlie soon learns that trusting a man called “Murder” who controls zombies may not have been the smartest move…

The film is often cited as the first zombie film ever made, but don’t eXXXpect much flesh-eatin’ goodness. What makes this film a true nightmare is its bizarro, hypnotic atmosphere. Sure, it lacks gore, but it’s still pretty darn spoopy! This film puts you in a terrifying trance, as if you were under the control of Murder himself. Speaking of that ghoul, Lugosi’s deliberately stilted performance is brilliantly weird and from a realm different from our own. Murder is certainly not the most endearing of Lugosi roles, but its definitely one of the creepiest.
Oh, Murder… we love that voodoo that you do so well… 🙂

Fall under the spell and watch White Zombie below:

P.S-. A little-known rock band named themselves after this movie… I hope those kids go places. 😉

#MonsterMovieMonday: Mr. Sardonicus (AKA Happy Birthday, William Castle!)

How do you do, my revolting readers? It’s William Castle’s Birthday, so it’s time once again to ho-nor this master of movie mayhem.
Mr. Castle has no equal when it comes to ghoulish amusements. He was the man who turned theater seats into joy buzzers, unleashed plastic skeletons upon audiences, and gave us the ability to see ghosts through cardboard. Alfred Hitchcock (Castle’s friendly rival) may have made more “prestigious” pictures, but Castle gave us a circus. Castle was the merriest master of the macabre ever to live and he will forever be my “Hitch-cock.” 😉
Of his many triumphs, I think I am most fond of Mr. Sardonicus. Master Castle’s films usually dealt with contemporary terrors, but Mr. Sardonicus was, in the legend’s own words, “an old-fashioned story.” In its essence, this is a Universal Gothic done in Castle’s inimitable idiom. Mr. Sardonicus is a tale of castles and fog, of masks and madmen, and of graves and… ghouls. “Ghoul” is very popular word, but it’s seldom used in its literal sense. Take, for example, William Castle. He’s a “ghoul” in the sense that he revels in the macabre and gruesome, but he certainly didn’t dig up graves and feast on corpses. (It’s not in his autobiography. ;))

Mr. Sardonicus does play with the idea of a figurative ghoul vs. a true ghoul. The truth falls more towards the former, but the latter is alluded to heavily. The fact that the idea of a real ghoul is hinted at all is unusual for a horror picture, and it is fascinating to deal with even the potential of one. The “ghoul” in the film is the tit-ular Sardonicus, though he is less a “Mr.” and more a “Baron.” While digging up his father’s grave to retrieve a winning lottery ticket (if I had a nickle…;)), Baron Sardonicus is so frightened by the sight of his father’s grinning skull that it actual causes his face to freeze in a permanent grin! Because of the grave-robbing and the unnatural deformation that occurs, he refers to himself as a ghoul.

In truth, he owes a little more to The Man Who Laughs and The Phantom of the Opera than a traditional ghoul. Like the unusual gentlemen in those stories, Sardonicus is a mortal man with ghastly visage and a mask. The audience could feel a certain sympathy for The Baron, although he does test one’s capacity for mercy with his habit of torturing girls with leaches, not to mention his cruelty towards his servant. Really, it’s up to the individual to decide if Sardonicus is worthy of redemption or condemnation. Of this, Castle was painfully aware. Not missing the chance for a bit of fun, Castle came up with another ingenious gimmick: The Punishment Poll.
The Punishment Poll was classic Castle. Ostensibly, the audience could decide on whether or not they wanted to show the ghoul mercy by voting on one of two endings. Each theater-goer was given a glow-in-the-dark card featuring a hand with the thumb out. When instructed by Mr. Castle in the film, they voted by holding up the card with either the thumb up or down as to whether Sardonicus would live or die. The gag? There was only one ending filmed! In the film, Castle “tallies” the votes and announces the result immediately, with no break in the continuity of the scene. Like a great magic trick, the act was fake, but the fun was very real. Besides, the ending we got is deliciously nasty! It’s the perfect twisted punchline and I can’t imagine a more fitting way to end the story of Sardonicus. My lips are sealed when it comes to specifics, but it’s a fantastic note to end on.

In ho-nor of Mr. Castle’s birthday, we have provided Mr. Sardonicus in all its ghoulish glory, I cannot recommend this film enough. It represents everything that was fantastic about William Castle and is just about the most fun one could have being repulsed and lied to! 😉 For a bit of Castle’s carny brilliance, check out the film below:

Happy Birthday, Mr. Castle!
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