Apprehended: The Pokey Edition, Part 2

(Submitted by Smutmaster Eric, of corpse…Thank you, Klinky Ho-mie! 😉 xoxo)

Suicide Squad (2016)

Braless & Lawless (2012)

Phoenix Marie and her loser husband Jason need to be on a flight except Jason got his ass thrown into lock up. Can Phoenix use her feminine wiles to seduce the officer and get her husband out?

Down by Law (1986)
Two innocent people are arrested. An interesting third person, with broken English, joins them in their cell. On his idea, they decide to escape from the prison. Their journey is the rest of the movie.

The Dark Knight (2008)

Bonus:

The Inmates

Movie Review: Batman & Harley Quinn

(Seemed appropriate for #HarleyQuinnDay…Big thanks to Prince Adam for sharing his Bat-thoughts with us. 🙂 xoxo)

“Batman and Nightwing are forced to team with the Joker’s sometimes-girlfriend Harley Quinn to stop a global threat brought about by Poison Ivy and Jason Woodrue, the Floronic Man.” (Warner Brothers)

This movie had me the minute it was set in the style of Batman: The Animated Series, featuring the voices of Kevin Conroy as Batman and Loren Lester as Nightwing, The new addition to the Bat-Family, comes in the form of Melissa Rauch, of The Big Bang Theory fame, as Harley Quinn. To be honest, it was her casting that worried me. I though her name recognition from TBBT and the signature voice of her character, would take me out of the movie and be a hindrance to the character. However, Melissa was fantastic and except for one time when she screamed at someone in the film, did I recognize it was her and get pulled out of the film, otherwise the actress totally disappeared and all I saw and heard was Harley Quinn. Hearing Kevin Conroy and Loren Lester again, felt so right and sounded like the pitch perfect dynamic duo. It’s like they have been doing this for 25 years straight, with no time lapses in between. Giving a voice to Poison Ivy for this film was Paget Brewster. She was okay, but I don’t think she was distinctly Ivy enough. That’s not necessarily her fault though because, she only had one scene where she employs Ivy’s trademark seductive, hypnotic sexiness to get a man to do her bidding. Poison Ivy’s partner in crime n this feature is Jason Woodrue aka the Floronic Man. The inclusion of this villain fits, given Ivy’s involvement and I really like his inclusion, not because I’m a huge fan of the character but because, he’s never really used. Come to think of it, even amongst Batman’s heavy hitters, Poison Ivy was underused. Even when she featured in episodes of Batman: TAS. The Floronic Man is voiced by Kevin Michael Richardson. This actor voiced The Joker for four seasons on The Batman but never once did I hear The Joker in this performance, which speaks to his range and versatility. Though, his voice is tailor made for portraying a villain.

As for why Harley Quinn would help Batman and Nightwing, it’s because she’s trying to live her life on the straight and narrow. Especially, since she has separated from The Joker. However, due to her criminal past, no reputable organization would hire someone with a criminal past and record, as a psychiatrist. Though, she makes a point at hinting that late nigh risqué movie producers have shown interest. Instead, Harley take a job at a bar called Superbabes. The waitresses all dress up in skimpy superhero costumes and are often ogled and groped by male patrons. One night Harley is grabbed in the ass, flips the customer over a table and starts a bar fight before heading home. This whole time, Nightwing was tailing her, following her back to a rundown, abandoned apartment. Naturally, there is a scuffle and Harley Quinn not only holds her own against Nightwing but knocks him out. When he comes to, Nightwing realizes that he’s tied up. Harley, changing out of her costume is in her bra and panties. She begins being flirtatious with Nightwing, saying they both have something the other wants. Nightwing protests, in a half assed way, before admitting the idea of being with Harley does sound appealing, The lights go out, the costumes come off and the scene cuts away as the implied sex scene happens off screen. Some reactions online, have people up in arms, throwing a hissy fit over this scene. Firstly, some are calling the moment a glorified rape scene, given that he was tied up and at first refused Harley’s suggestion. If you actually rewatch the scene, you can see that it’s quite clear that Nightwing is more than agreeable to having sexual relations with Harley. Once Nightwing agrees, I view the ropes as some kinky, superhero/supervillain role-play type of scenario. Prior to that scene, when both characters were physically fighting, Harley Quinn was verbalizing that she was tired of people telling her what to be and assigning a label to her. For example, some see her as crazy, others see her only as a villain, while others still, view her as a sex object. She mentions, how she wants to be in control and determine who she is. While some see the sex scene as demeaning, only further objectifying Harley, I saw her initiating the flirtation, and being in control of that situation. I saw it as a moment of empowerment for Harley Quinn. That’s my take on the whole “controversy.”

As for why Nightwing was following Harley and not Batman? The Dark Knight was busy doing detective work, uncovering Poison Ivy and the Floronic Man’s diabolical scheme. Firstly, I love that this film focuses on Batman being a detective. To me, Batman: TAS and issues of Detective Comics, are the only two interpretations, that really key in on this aspect of his character. Speaking of our villains’ plan, it involve using samples of Alec Holland’s (Swamp Thing’s) blood, mixed with a chemical agent, that when dispersed, would turn the human population into plant like creatures, such as Floronic Man and Swamp Thing. I like that the evil plot is perfectly symbiotic with the overall goals and beliefs of our villains, unlike that time when Poison Ivy teamed up with Mr. Freeze in 1997, and their plans were in complete opposition and counterintuitive of each other. Back over at Team Batman, when the Caped Crusader rejoins Harley and Nightwing, he catches them in a compromising position. While he doesn’t say it outright, you can tell he is judgemental of what they did. Nightwing responds with; “Oh right, like you’ve never made out with a villain before.” I loved this line because, it’s a clever callback to Batman’s trysts with Catwoman and Talia al Ghul respectively. It also calls out Batman’s hypocrisy in this moment, but also speaks to the closeness and rapport between Batman and Nightwing, that Dick Grayson can speak to Bruce this way. With Harley assisting Batman and Nightwing, you knew humor would be a key feature of this film and it is. As the three drive in the Batmobile to find Ivy’s location, Harley complains that a burrito she ate earlier isn’t agreeing with her and they should pull over. Batman refuses and Harley retorts; you asked for it, before beginning to fire off some farts. Batman & Nightwing’s facial reactions are hilarious. Yes, I know getting laughs from farts is a bit cheap and childish, but in addition to her sexiness, Harley Quinn has always had a childishness about her, so it works. There’s also a scene where Batman calls the Justice League for potential backup. However, all the heavy hitters are off world, so Booster Gold starts naming a bunch of C and D list superheroes that could help out. As Booster Gold’s voice rattles off names through the intercom of the Batmobile, Harley Quinn and Nightwing shake their head no and make faces in disapproval, before ruffling papers to make it sound like their was static, before hanging up on Booster Gold. This was priceless and had me in stiches. Harley Quinn’s influence is clearly rubbing off on Nightwing. Harley takes Batman and Nightwing to a bar for supervillain henchmen, where she meets an informant, who has info on Poison Ivy’s location. To get info out of an informant, Harley has to sing karaoke. That’s not the fun part though, as Melissa Rauch unfortunately is a terrible singer. However, the henchmen featured at this bar, are ones featured in the Batman 66 TV series, specifically noticeable are Catwoman’s henchmen. They even buy Batman a glass of milk, as a nod to his drink of choice on the Adam West series.

When the unlikely trio finds Poison Ivy and Floronic Man, Harley Quinn pretends to double cross Batman and Nightwing, to gain their trust, However, when she pleads with Ivy to not go through with releasing this pathogen, Ivy realizes Harley lied to her. Even Batman tries to appeal to Poison Ivy’s humanity, pointing out that if she makes even one mistake with the formula, all of humanity will be wiped out. When she still doesn’t budge, Harley Quinn removes her mask and makeup, gives Ivy a “puppy dog” look and begins to cry, lamenting that she doesn’t want to die. Ivy can’t resist Harley crying and agrees not to release the toxin on humanity. She too now turns on the Floronic Man. While some may say Poison Ivy’s turn was too easy, I liked it! It really emphasises the close knit relationship and love that Harley and Ivy share. This is both emphasized in the comic books and animated series. There are a few things, that I didn’t like about this film. Aside from the fight scene between Harley Quinn and Nightwing, which was awesome, the action in this film is extremely limited. And when it is their, the film cuts away from it, When you see the henchman bar fight, you’ll know what I mean. Swamp Thing has a cameo in the third act, condemns Ivy & the Floronic Man for what they’ve done, but refuses to get in the fight. He doesn’t get involved because “It’s not his “fight.” What!? How is it not his fight? They tampered with his blood and what they plan to do, is going to alter The Green, the nature that Swamp Thing is sworn to protect. How is that not his fight? It made no sense. What a wasted cameo. Also, I was let down by the final battle with The Floronic Man and it stems (pun intended), from the reasons I just mentioned.

This film has key voice cast from Batman: The Animated Series, the animation style evokes later seasons of Batman: The Animated Series, which was rebranded The New Batman Adventures but one thing that is different is the tone. Sure, there is some dramatic story telling of the classic animated series, but this is more of a comedy set in that world. So prepare yourself for that but you know what, for me, it really works. I have never laughed so much while watching a DC Animated show, or movie. If you want a good laugh and 75 minutes of fun with characters you love, give this film a buy and a watch. Happy Batman/Harley Quinn Takeover Day everyone!

News Bleed: The “Comic Con Catch-Up” Edition

Ho-wdy, Kinky Kreeps! Another San Diego Comic Con has bitten the dust, but we’re here to give you some of the biggest Noose from the event! In addition to this post, we will also be covering DC’s big reveals and the coolest monster toys of the con! So, without any further A-BOO…

Scream Factory will unleash all sorts of monstrosities, including Silent Night Deadly Night, Drag Me to Hell, The Darkman Sequels, Misery, and Attack of the Puppet People!  :) Daily Dead

Blumhouse & Todd McFarlane makes a deal with the Devil to summon Spawn! DeadlineSan Diego becomes ScareDiego! Warner Bros. and New Line Cinema keep it creepy with IT, the very first footage of The Nun, Annabelle: Creation, Q&As and scene descriptions! Here are the Q&As/scene descriptions! 🙂 Dread Central

The new The Walking Dead trailer gets bloody. 🙂 The Verge

Darkness falls across the land in the new Stranger Things trailer. 🙂 Variety

Robot Chicken takes a bite out of The Walking Dead. 🙂 UPROXX

Harley Quinn takes over Batman Day this year! 🙂 Polygon

Michelle Pfeiffer is The Wasp, Captain Marvel loves the ’90s, Skrulls attack, Infinity War, Black Panther, and new footage… Check out everything Marvel unveiled! BBC

News Bleed: The “Cult of DOOM!” Edition

Fargo creator Noah Hawley is the harbinger of Doom… Doctor Doom, that is. 🙂 Variety

American Horror Story finally reveals its title! 🙂 Screen Rant

David Cronenberg’s Consumed gets consumed by AMC! Deadline

The first Pacific Rim: Uprising urges you to join the Jaeger Uprising! 🙂 Entertainment Weekly

Game on! Check out the first Jigsaw trailer! Forbes

Halloween finally comes to Disney California Adventure. 🙂 Attractions Magazine

No more clowning around… a Harley Quinn vs. The Joker movie is (reportedly) happening! Movie Web

Hidden Faces: The Masked Edition, Part 2

(Submitted by the Smuttiest Smutmaster in the known universe, Mr. Smutmaster Eric…Thanks so much, Kinky Ho-mie! 🙂 xoxo)

Featuring: Michelle Pfeiffer, Sunny Lane, Aurora Snow, Phoenix Marie & Rosario Dawson

Batman Returns (1992)

Batman: The Animated Series, S2/Ep7 (1994)

Batgirl XXX: An Extreme Comixxx Parody (2012)

Sin City: A Dame to Kill For (2014)

Bonus #1:

Rosario in great leaked selfies!

Bonus #2:

Kinky Klown from Outer Space

(Ha! I know that Klown!! 😉 xoxo -DP)

#SuperheroSaturday Comic Book Review: Injustice: Gods Among Us #4-6

WE INTERRUPT YOUR REGULARLY SCHEDULED COMIC REVIEW TO PRESENT YOU WITH THIS VERY IMPORTANT #SUPERHEROSATURDAY ANNOUNCEMENT: THE FREAKING JUSTICE LEAGUE TRAILER HAS BEEN RELEASED!!! *REPEAT* THE FREAKING JUSTICE LEAGUE TRAILER HAS BEEN RELEASED!!! (And it’s dope AF, as the kool kids say. ;))

Sooooooo badass, yes, but also sooooooooo far away!! 🙁 Which brings us back to this rockin’ review from Mr. SuperheroSciFi himself, Prince Adam…Thanks for giving us a lil’ something to help fill the gap, Heroic Ho-mie. xoxoxo (PS- #thatswhatshesaid ;))

“In the wake of the unspeakable tragedy he unwittingly helped to trigger, Superman faces his greatest loss and his most challenging moral decision ever. Everything is about to pivot on the choice he makes; it could change the course of the world–and the lives of all the super heroes–forever. Green Arrow is featured in a solo adventure. Fearful of Superman’s vengeance, the archer is put in charge of protecting the Joker’s crazed accomplice, Harley Quinn. Finding somewhere to hide Harley isn’t the challenge–keeping his sanity during prolonged contact with her is. But who will be the first one to drive the other crazy? Still reeling from the destruction of Metropolis, news from a war-torn country creates a tipping point for the Man of Steel. He decides it’s time for him to take a more proactive role in stopping man’s inhumanity to man. But does the sudden appearance of Wonder Woman mean he’s created a new enemy or converted an ally to his cause?” (DC Comics)

Two out of the three books deal with the fallout of the Joker’s heinous crimes, while the middle issue is a humorous but still heartfelt interlude that lightens the mood. Issues 4 & 6, show Superman going through stages of grief and anger. The scene with Superman holding a deceased Lois Lane in his arms in the middle of the detonation zone was such a quietly haunting moment, which lingers long after you’ve read the story. There’s an incredible exchange between Batman and the Joker that calls to mind The Killing Joke and The Dark Knight. When Joker explains that he did what he did, because it would be fun to see how Superman would react, proves that Tom Taylor has grasped Joker’s chaos and sick mentality. Issues #4 & 6 really set up Superman’s status quo hinted at in the game. Superman kills Joker in such a way that is so shocking, at least to this Superman fan. The death of his wife, the fact that he broke one of his cardinal rules, and add that to what he’s witnessing in a war-torn country and Superman decides to be more forceful! After revealing his identity, he puts the world on notice that he won’t allow the loss of anymore innocent lives. Killing and getting involved in wars, foreign or domestic, are against type for Superman but given what he’s been through, completely understandable. Even though this book is a video game tie-in, none of these reactions feel forced to line up with the game. These occurrences progress very naturally. Issue #5 was a nice change of pace. It was mostly Green Arrow babysitting Harley Quinn, a.k.a. keeping her hidden from Superman. The result is an exchange between Harley and Oliver, where Tom Taylor reminds fans that at one point in comics’ history, Green Arrow was a cheap Batman knockoff. In the midst of the humor, Mr. Taylor manages to remind readers that a hero who is not afraid to go over the edge for justice and a homicidal maniac are still people with emotions and a need for human comfort.

There are so many great images in these three issues. Seriously, the scene with Batman & the Joker looks so much like the “The Dark Knight”, especially Batman. The scene where Superman kills Joker will leave you speechless. It’s quite the jarring imagery. Likewise, the previously mentioned image of Superman cradling Lois’ lifeless body will send shivers through your body. Mike Miller does great work in issues #4 & 6. Bruno Redondo draws issue #5 and treats fans to a look at vintage Oliver Queen, while giving Harley Quinn a more dangerous yet sexy updated look. The only thing I didn’t like was the Arrow car. It looks ridiculous to me. Jheremy Raapack creates a stunning depiction of a Batman vs. Superman confrontation for the cover! Seeing as these are my two favourite characters, this cover leaves me captivated yet conflicted, just like the movie did!


The creative team continues to create a book that I consistently want to read. It firmly makes my top 3 “must read” list, despite have great “new” comics to read every week Since it feels like there is so much more to come, it could easily find itself standing at the very top of that list before too long!

Comic Book Review- Gotham City Sirens: Union

(Submitted by Mr. Prince Adam…Thank you, Superest of Sirs! 😉 xoxo)

“Hang out with the bad girls of Gotham City! Catwoman, Poison Ivy and Harley Quinn are tired of playing by other people’s rules–regardless of which side of the law they’re on. These tough ladies have a new agenda all their own, and they’ll use any means necessary to pursue it. But can they get along and work as a team? And who will get hurt along the way?” (DC Entertainment)

I knew this group was a thing, mainly due to their interactions in Batman: The Animated series and later additional animated shorts. Somehow I missed out on the debut of this book in 2009 and in all honesty, I’m slightly ashamed by that fact. However, the three characters in this book are my favourite female characters in the DCU, along with Wonder Woman of course. Since the announcement of the Gotham City Sirens film, I’ve been looking for anything I could get my hands on regarding these three characters, eventually stumbling on this book. The first six issues chronicle the formation of the Gotham City Sirens. This book is definitely in continuity with DC books at the time. If you were keeping up with DC at the time, it will enrich your reading experience of this book. If you weren’t, enough general information is given so you won’t be lost. What you need to know is as follows; Batman is presumed dead by his allies, but is really lost in time. As a result, Dick Grayson has taken up the cape and cowl of his mentor. Meanwhile, the villainous Hush has had facial reconstruction surgery and is know the spitting image of Bruce Wayne. Armed with intimate details of his former friend, he intends to tear Bruce’s name and life apart from the inside out. The Riddler has apparently shunned his criminal ways, with Edward Nygma serving as a private investigator. The Joker, Batman’s arch nemesis is nowhere to be found. The book picks up with Catwoman returning to Gotham after the near death experience of having her heart ripped out by Hush, who as I mentioned, is posing as Bruce Wayne. Catwoman’s life was saved by Zatanna and some serious magic trickery. Catwoman still isn’t feeling right and when she is nearly defeated by a C list thug trying to make a name for himself, Poison Ivy comes to her rescue. She then takes Catwoman back to see Harley, who has been staying with Ivy ever since her breakup with the Joker, followed by his disappearance. When Catwoman realizes that Ivy and Harley have commandeered Riddler’s apartment, she finds he’s hopelessly in love and trapped under Ivy’s spell. Catwoman admonishes them, and question what they did with the cut of the money she gave them after the original Hush storyline. Naturally, Poison Ivy donated her portion of the money to the Costa Rican Rainforest Fund. Harley Quinn meanwhile has frivolously spent her money on shopping sprees and got scammed into sending her cut of the money to a Nigerian Prince. When Catwoman realizes that her fellow criminals, as well as herself are somewhat lost and adrift, she proposes that they not only join forces as a team, but also live together in the abandoned dog and cat shelter Catwoman is having retrofitted as a home. They agree and the Gotham City Sirens are born.

Paul Dini is a master at handling these characters. While we know both Catwoman and Poison Ivy to be dominant, fierce, and seductively in charge women, Dini reminds us that these villainesses have a heart and motherly instinct about them. I love the idea that despite their different views and methods, there is a solidarity in place between them and they look out for each other. At different times, each character becomes the “mother” of the other. This makes sense, given Catwoman’s nurturing nature towards cats, as well as Holly Robinson. Then you have Poison Ivy who considers all pant life her children. In the larger team dynamic, both Catwoman and Ivy are motherly figures to the naïve, childlike innocence that is Harley Quinn. Yes, I say that knowing that Harley is full on bat-shit crazy. Everything is not all copasetic between our new trifecta at first, as Harley and Ivy subdue Catwoman and use one of Ivy’s potions to discern the identity of Batman. This plot point serves as a great reminder that while theses 3 are friends, they’re still supervillains, and would turn on each other if they felt it absolutely necessary. Through flashbacks, Paul Dini crafts an interesting loophole as to how Catwoman is able to resist revealing Bruce Wayne to be Batman. Years earlier, Catwoman visited Talia al Ghul, who used Yoga and mystical potion of some sort to create a scenario in Selina’s head, that over the years several men have been Batman. These men included Bruce Wayne, Harvey Dent and Jim Gordon. Selina believed this tale so vividly, that even Ivy’s elixir couldn’t detect it as a lie. To my knowledge, this story point is new to this story, yet Paul Dini works it in seamlessly, having me believing it actually happened in a previous story I read. It didn’t, I checked.

The predominant action beats of the story focus on Harley Quinn, with fake Bruce Wayne aka Hush out to kill her. Actually, he wants to kill all three of the Gotham City Sirens for ultimately turning on him and double crossing him during the original Hush story, he’s just chosen to start with Harley so he can gain info on the other Gotham City Sirens and draw them out into the open. Harley saves “Bruce Wayne” from being mugged and in return, he takes her for a night on the town. What Hush intends to actually do, is find out the whereabouts of Poison Ivy and Catwoman and then kill her. As crazy and as tough as Harley Quinn is, it’s incredible how easily she falls for the suave playboy act and how needy she gets when a man shows her attention. We’ve known this about the character but I think the impact of this mentality is lessened in the animated series. Keep in mind, I read the six issues in succession, so Harley Quinn’s naïve more submissive demeanour towards men comes off stronger in this book. Catwoman and Poison Ivy arrive just in time to save Harley. While Poison Ivy tends to Harley. Catwoman contains Bruce Wayne/Hush. In their brief interaction, you could feel Catwoman’s contempt and hatred for Hush. The beauty of this moment is she wants to kill him, but the world doesn’t know he’s Hush. They think he is Bruce Wayne, so she has no choice but to let him go, and that drives her insane. That isn’t the end of trouble for the Gotham City Sirens because The Joker comes crashing through the Sirens new home with his Joker mobile. He berates Harley, blames her for making him go soft, and vows to kill her. I see a lot of people on Social media claim the Harley and the Joker pairing as relationship goals, but this segment of the book, reminds readers, why this relationship is not the standard to strive for. The Joker took a strong, independent psychiatrist, and mentally broker her, turning her into a naïve childlike woman, submissive and dependant on a lunatic, while being partly crazy herself. Remember, this is coming from a guy who loves the character of Harley Quinn.

When the Sirens regain consciousness and dig themselves out of the rubble that remains of their new home, they convince Harley to lead them to one of the Joker’s main hideouts. She takes them to an abandoned ware house, where the Joker is waiting for them. He sets a trap detaining the other girls, while separating himself and Harley. As he has her tied up and is doing a grandstanding monologue prior to finishing her off, the biggest twist of the book occurs. Harley Quinn is not being targeted by the Joker, but rather his former sidekick Gagswoth A. Gagsworthy. He harbours resentment towards Harley because as previously stated, she changed the Joker, who tossed him aside in favour of her. The thing about the Joker bait and switch, is I didn’t see it coming. The banter between Harley and Joker felt so authentic to the crazy couple, that I didn’t even consider a possible fake out. Since Paul Dini is the co-creator of this relationship [, the fact that he was able to misdirect me so flawlessly, should come as no shock. This plot point gave us two sets of flashbacks involving The Joker. The first focused on his time with Gagsworth by his side. These pages featured a more flamboyant over the top Joker. In the flashbacks with Harley, we see a more violent, sardonic Joker. I love that it was something so simple that set him off. One night, after’s Harley insisted on going in a joy ride in the Joker mobile, a bunch of street hoods make fun of the Joker and his car. He shoots them, and from that point on, vows to put all his flamboyant over the top gimmicks and weaponry in storage, never to be used again. That something so minor such as name calling could drive The Joker over the edge, not only to shoot someone, but to go down an even darker and psychotic path, shows how off his rocker the Joker must be right from the get go. All it takes is a little push. The Gotham City Sirens escape Gagsworth, and the book ends with Harley swearing off The Joker forever, before ultimately changing her mind because Gagsworth wasn’t the real Mr. J. Catwoman and Poison Ivy roll their eyes at Harley’s comments, as they drive away to their next adventure.

Guillem March is the artist of this first story. Since this book, he’s continued to get work in the Batman corner of the universe. So the folks over at DC Entertainment clearly like what he brought to the table on this book! Rightfully so, as his work on this book is fantastic. His art showcases a lot of range. His covers evoke a pinup style of photography, and it is reminiscent of the current DC Bombshells book that is available monthly. The scenes with Catwoman/Talia and Batman/Riddler have an earthier gritty feel about them. The Harley Quinn pages are very bubbly and just pop with imagery and color. They kind of remind me of Katy Perry’s video California Girls! Sadly cupcake covered boobs didn’t make an appearance. The flashback Joker sequences were especially good. The flashbacks of Joker and Gagsworth in battle against Batman and Robin looked like elaborate story boards for the Adam West Batman show. Everything from costumes, to look of the characters, over the top giant props and color pallet was on point with the show. The one where Joker gives up on the gags and kills those thugs gets a much darker tint and color palette. Even the line work looks to be pointier. I see a lot of the Killing Joke homage happening here. Two of my favourite images in the book are the Joker mobile crashing through the window of the abandoned animal shelter, and Ivy manipulating a cactus to grow large enough to shield them and the remainder of the shelter from further attacks by the Joker. That second image reminded me so much of the scene in Guardians of the Galaxy when Groot grows large, acting as a shield to protect his team,

This was a great start to open this book. Since this first story arc focused on Harley Quinn, while the other two played supporting roles, I hope future arcs will each focus on Catwoman and Poison Ivy respectively. Judging by this initial story, it’s a shame this book only lasted 3 years. However, it means that I still have 2 and a half years of story to read and review. Hopefully, the immense popularity of Harley Quinn and the forthcoming Gotham City Sirens movie will lead to a relaunch of this title!

The (Nearly) Complete Guide to the Batman Rogues in The Lego Batman Movie

(You asked for it, and you got it, fiends!! Kinky Kudos to Mr. Anton Phibes for putting together this complete -save for one dude we couldn’t figure out- list of all the random rogues in Lego Batman…You’ve done the Lord’s work here kind evil villainous sir. xoxoxo)

Greetings, fair citizens.  The Lego Batman Movie recently came out and was a Bat-Smash Hit. One of the absolute joys of the film was its clear love for all things Batman. The Dark Knight Detective has been around for over 75 years, constantly changing to thrill new audiences and reflect the current cultural climate. This also applies to his villains. From the very beginning, Batman’s rogues tended to be a reflection of the character. Like like the Caped Crusader himself, they’ve ranged from menacing to goofy, sometimes doing both at once. If you are a fan of any iteration of The Bat, The Lego Batman Movie has at least one villain cameo to put a smile on your face, without the use of Joker Venom. That’s why we’ve compiled this list of nearly every Batman rogue to appear in the film for your convenience  and pleasure.

We wish to express our gratitude to the friends of Batman and his fabulous rogues. To them, and to lovers of adventure, lovers of pure escapism, lovers of unadulterated entertainment, lovers of the ridiculous and the bizarre— To funlovers everywhere— This post is respectfully dedicated. If we have overlooked any sizable groups of lovers, we apologize.

The Joker
First Appearance: Batman #1

The Clown Prince of Crime headlines this Carnival of Crime.  Thankfully, he had that ‘Damaged” tattoo removed before shooting.

The Riddler
First Appearance: Detective Comics #140

Riddle me this: what do this Lego-ized puzzle plunderer and The Dark Knight Returns’ David Endocrine have in common? They were both voiced by Conan O’Brien!

Harley Quinn
First Appearance: Batman: The Animated Series: Joker’s Favor

We have nothing but Mad love for psychotic psychiatrist here at Kinky Horror!

Catwoman
First Appearance: Batman #1

“Life’s a brick… now so am I”

The Scarecrow
First Appearance: World’s Finest Comics #3

Gotham’s Master of Terror! Dr. Johnathan Crane uses his “fear toxin” to force victims to face their worst fears. Oh, Scarecrow… I think I’ll fear you most of all!

Two-Face and Captain Boomerang
Two-Face’s First Appearance: Detective Comics #66
Captain Boomerang’s First Appearance: The Flash #117

We finally got to face Two-Face… portrayed by Billy Dee Williams, Tim Burton’s Harvey Dent. As for Captain Boomerang, he just came back around after Suicide Squad.

The Penguin
First Appearance: Detective Comics #58

This crafty criminal has always played fowl.

Killer Croc
First Appearance: Detective Comics #523

Born with a Crocodilian appearance, this criminal has teeth.

Clayface and Bane
Clayface’s First Appearance: Detective Comics #40
Bane’s First Appearance: Batman: Vengeance of Bane #1

Bane is the man who broke the Bat’s back and would be great in an El Santo biopic.

Much like a diabolical Gumby, Clayface possesses a clay-like body and shape-shifting abilities

Poison Ivy
First Appearance: Batman #181

This florid fiend is one with nature. Her kisses are killer.

Mr. Freeze
First Appearance: Batman #121

A cold-hearted villain known to give his enemies the cold shoulder.

March Harriet
First Appearance: Detective Comics #841

Curiouser and curiouser.. this Wonderlandian crook made an appearance… but the Mad Hatter is missing… Guess he was late for tea.

Gentleman Ghost
First Appearance: Flash Comics #88

A notorious highwayman and robber, the ghastly motivations of Gentleman Ghost are transparent.

Clock King
First Appearance: World’s Finest #11

Time is on his side. Yes, it is.

Calendar Man
First Appearance: Detective Comics #259

This guy is up to date when it comes to dates. A more sinister Calender Man played a role in the classic storyline, The Long Halloween.

Zodiac Master
First Appearance: Detective Comics #323

I wonder what his sign is?

Condiment King
First Appearance: Batman: The Animated Series: Make ’em Laugh

This criminal will surely relish your defeat.

Orca
First Appearance: Batman #579

After suffering a spinal cord injury, Grace Balin had it partially repaired with a Killer Whale’s spinal cord, transforming her into a whale monster. I hate it when that happens!

Cat-Man
First Appearance: Detective Comics #311

This villain has a clear case of Cat Scratch Fever.

King Tut
First Appearance: Batman ’66: The Curse of Tut

From the Adam West series comes this Phreaky Pharaoh.

Eraser
First Appearance: Batman #188

His inability to do well in school led to a life of eraser-based evil.

Zebra-Man
First Appearance: Detective Comics #275

Despite the name, his stripped appearance was the result of magnetic powers. Frankly, I was hoping it had to do with a radioactive zebra.

Kite Man
First Appearance: Batman #133

This gentleman is exactly what he sounds like. Go fly a kite!

Crazy Quilt
First Appearance: Boy Commandos #15

This colorful crook canonly see in blinding, disorienting colors. His whole life is a Dario Argento film!

Mutant Leader
First Appearance: The Dark Knight Returns

From the Frank Miller’s gritty classic, this dude knows how to slice and dice.

Tarantula
First Appearance: Nightwing #71

You wouldn’t want to get tangled up in this master assassin’s web.

Mime
First Appearance: Batman #412

The daughter of a fireworks salesman, her father’s noisy profession and the fireworks-based death of her parents led her to become a crime mine. If I had a nickel…

Polka Dot Man
First Appearance: Detective Comics #300

Looking rather like a sentient game of Twister, this felon has the ability to pull weapons from out of the polka dots on his costume.

Killer Moth
First Appearance: Batman #63

Known as the “Batman of Crime,” this crook is enemy to justice and clothing alike.

Doctor Phosphorus
First Appearance: Detective Comics #469

This skull-faced goon is radioactive! He has a bright career in crime ahead of him.

The Red Hood
First Appearance: Detective Comics #168

An alias used by many, the first Red Hood was actually the Joker! Talk about seeing red…

Calculator
First Appearance: Detective Comics #463

A calculating crook like no other! Does he know how to write 80085?

Man-Bat
First Appearance: Detective Comics #400

Part Man! Part Bat! All Terror!

Hugo Strange, Magpie, Kabuki Twins, and Egghead
Hugo Strange’s First Appearance: Detective Comics #36
Magpie’s First Appearance: The Man of Steel #1
Kabuki Twins’ First Appearance: The Batman: Call of the Cobblepot
Egghead’s First Appearance: Batman ’66: An Egg Grows in Gotham

Hugo Strange is one of the earliest Bat-enemies and the first to deduce Batman’s identity. The doctor is in… SANE!

Magpie is villain obsessed with shiny things… She and This Guy would certainly get along

The Kabuki Twins are martial arts experts who only appered in The Batman. I’m seeing double!

A villain originated by Vincent Price! How egg-cellent is that?!


Unfortunately, this post is only nearly complete because of the winged gentleman on the right. If anyone has any ideas, we’re all ears! 🙂

That’s it for now! Keep checking in… Same Kinky time, same Kinky website!