Rest in Peace, Haruo Nakajima.

Haruo Nakajima was, in more ways than one, the King of the Monsters. From 1954 to 1972, Nakajima was the man behind Godzilla, donning the legendary suit for some of the greatest monster movies of all time. As if one timeless sci-fi icon wasn’t enough, the great Nakajima also portrayed Rodan  Varan, Baragon, Gaira, the larva form of Mothra, and several kaijus in both Ultra Q and Ultraman. Nakajima was a true giant in genre cinema and his creatures will continue to inspire both fright and delight in fright fans for many years to come. Haruo Nakajima was an incredible, unstoppable titan of terror.


Rest in Peace, King of the Monsters. xoxo

Thanks for the Memories, June.

“One of the few misconceptions about June is to think of her wonderful talent as ‘voice-over’. Nothing could be further from the truth. June is worthy of the gift-word: actress. She imbues a part with herself, be it a Mama Bear or the deadly cobra Nagaina in Rikki-Tikki-Tavi… in fact–and I speak with the deepest respect for him–I can only compliment Mel Blanc by saying that he could be called a male June Foray.”

– Chuck Jones

Even if her name is unfamiliar to you, there’s a good chance you grew up with June Foray. She was a woman of a thousand voices and of many timeless characters. Starting her career in 1937 and performing her final role in 2014,  Ms. Foray had delighted kids and adults alike for nearly a century. Her character voices include Rocky the Flying Squirrel, Jokey Smurf, Witch Hazel (Looney Tunes AND Disney), Granny from Looney Tunes, Twilight Zone’s Talky Tina, Lena Hyena/Wheezy the Weasel in Who Framed Roger Rabbit, Grammi Gummi in Gummi Bears, and Cindy Lou Who. And as impressive as those examples may be, they only represent a small portion of her massive career.  She was a giant in her field and played a huge part in the childhoods of many.

Though she may be gone, her voice will never fall silent. Every time a child discovers How The Grinch Stole Christmas, Cinderella, or any of her other fabulous classics, they will hear her. She will be a part of the childhoods of generations to come, living eternally through the laughter and joy she will continue to inspire.

In honor of the fabulous Ms. Foray, we present Broom-Stick Bunny, a short considered to be the best of the Witch Hazel cartoons. It is a true classic and showcases the enormous talent of Ms. Foray. Enjoy.


Thank you for everything, Ms. Foray.

#TBT, Part DeuXXX: Happy Birthday, Ray Harryhausen!

Happy Birthday to Cinema’s Great Magician, Ray Harryhausen!

 

As you cool ghouls and groovy ghoulies probably know, Ray Harryhausen was the mightiest stop motion animator in the cosmos. He was both Prometheus and Athena, sculpting creatures from clay and breathing life into them. Mr. Harryhausen brought many great monsters into existence with just his skilled hands and superhuman patience. What he did was magic, pure and simple.

In ho-nor of Mr. Harryhausen, we’ve dug up this groovy interview… conducted by Mr. Tim Burton! In it, you’ll hear Ray talk about the birth of several of his creations, watch Tim Burton try not give in to his inner-fanboy, and see the two mess around with a flying saucer from Earth vs. The Flying Saucers! It’s an incredible watch for lovers of fantastic cinema and Master Harryhausen. Enjoy, Kinky Ho-mies! 🙂 xoxo

Happy Birthday, Ray! Thanks for all the cinematic magic. 🙂 xoxo

#TBT: It’s Good to Be the King: Happy Birthday, Mel Brooks!

(#TBT to yesterday when I should’ve posted this…The sentiment remains the same, though, even if I’m sliiiiiiiiiiightly late with it. 😉 xoxo)

Happy 91st Birthday to a legend among legends, Mr. Mel Brooks!

There are really no words to properly describe the gargantuan impact Mr. Brooks has had on comedy, film, and, well… everything.  In his seven decades in show business, he’s pushed boundaries, made generations ho-wl with laughter, brought the film parody to its zenith, and showed us the high value of a cheap joke. He’s one of the very few people to score an EGOT (an Emmy, a Grammy, an Oscar, and a Tony) and, with a one-man show opening in Vegas, shows no signs of slowing down at 91.
In addition to all of that, Mel Brooks also has some serious ho-rror cred. He directed Young Frankenstein and Dracula: Dead and Loving It, the former being (arguably) one of the greatest and most respectful horror spoofs of all time. As for actual ho-rror films, Brooks produced Cronenberg’s The Fly and The Doctor and the Devils by Hammer legend Freddie Francis. While not strictly horror, he also produced David Lynch’s haunting The Elephant Man. In 2015, Mr. Brooks lent his voice to the vampire Vlad in Hotel Transylvania 2.

Happy Birthday, Mel Brooks! May you live to be 2000! 🙂 xoxoxo