Fangs for the Memories, Basil Gogos.

Filmland has just lost one of its most famous monsters…

Legendary artist Basil Gogos was, without a doubt, one of the finest painters known to horror. His jaw-dropping, mind-melting portraits of cinema’s greatest fiends graced the covers of many, many issues of Famous Monsters of Filmland. Starting with an eerie portrait of Vincent Price for Famous Monsters #9, Gogos created almost 50 wondrously macabre works for the publication. Gogos often bathed his monstrous subjects with brilliant colors from multiple light sources, highlighting their fearsome features with expressionistic radiance. His subjects included The Phantom of the Opera, Frankenstein, Dracula, The Wolf Man, The Mummy, King Kong, Godzilla, Gill-man, Mr. Sardonicus, Boris Karloff, Bela Lugosi, Vincent Price, and many other beloved fright icons. Mr. Gogos also brought his distinctive flair to CD covers for rock acts Rob Zombie, The Misfits and Electric Frankenstein.

Farewell, Basil Gogos. Your paintings brought out the beauty in the beast and inspired generations of monster lovers. Thank you for bringing color to black-and-white monsters. 🙂

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News Bleed: The “IT Conquered the Box Office” Edition

IT breaks all sorts of records and scares up $123 Million! A huge victory for Horror! Variety

Day of the Dead remake rises this year. 🙂 Movie Web

Marilyn Manson’s back, bitches!!! Rolling Stone

Daniel Dae Kim is in talks To replace Ed Skrein in the Hellboy reboot. Comic Book

Swamp Thing co-creator/Wolverine co-creator/Watchmen editor/all-around comic book legend Len Wein has passed away. 🙁 USA Today

R.I.P. Tales from the Crypt makeup artist Donna Henderson. 🙁

Here are two classics Tales eps featuring Ms. Henderson’s Makeup Magic:

#TBT: The “Happy Birthday, Dario Argento” Edition

Happy Birthday to that maestro of Italian ho-rror, Dario Argento!

From his very first picture back in 1970, Signor Argento has been haunting our collective nightmares with some of the most maddeningly beautiful ho-rror films in the world. I mean, the dude puts the “gore” in “gore-geous”! With jaw-dropping camera work, fabulous visuals, and his frequent use of startling colors,  Dario Argento brings a painterly beauty to the canvas of cinema. Among his masterworks are Deep Red, site favorite SuspiriaPhenomena with Jennifer Connelly, and 1987’s Opera.


In ho-nor of this mad artist’s birthaversary, we dug up this groovy documentary on the man. It features interviews with ho-rror legends, including John Carpenter, Alice Cooper, and Jessica Harper. Enjoy, Kreeps! 🙂

Happy Birthday, Dario! Stay scary! 🙂

#WerewolfWednesday: The Mad Monster (1942)

Howl-dy, hairy fiends!

Give it up for the Wolfman, boils and ghouls, ’cause it’s another wild ‘n’ dangerous #WerewolfWednesday!

For today’s loony lunar lark, we’ve got a cl-Ass-Sick howler from 1942, it’s The Mad Monster!

No! Not Mad Monster Party! The Mad Monster! Sheesh! Good minions are so hard to find these days! 😉


The Mad Monster is a groovy poverty row chiller-diller made by PRC to capitalize on the success of The Wolf Man. It stars the great George Zucco and Glenn Strange, years before his Frankenstein met Abbott and Costello. The plot concerns a mad scientist (‘natch) who develops a formula that turns his simple-minded gardener into a hideous werewolf… Yikes! That’s the only time a hair growth formula has worked TOO well!

George Zucco’s at his most marvelously mad here, serving up more tasty ham than a Christmas dinner. Glenn Strange is great in a turn that brings to mind Lon Chaney Jr. in both The Wolf Man and Of Mice and Men. On top of those wonderful performances, the film also has plenty o’ cl-Ass-ical frights ‘n’ delights to satisfy all you old-school ho-rror ho-unds out there. 🙂

Do you dare face the ho-rror of… The Mad Monster?!

#FBF: The “Die, Die Again, Vincent Price!” Edition

Ho-wdy, Kinky Kreeps!

Today’s Flashback Fare concerns one Mr. Vincent. Freakin’. Price.

There’s no ghoul in history that gives us those Tingler tingles like Mr. Vincent Price! I mean, he’s one of the indisputable Gods of Ho-rror! The Merchant of Menace! The King of the Grand Guignol! The man’s a legit legend! You could always tell he was having the time of his life… even when it ended… again and again and again!
On the Silver Scream, Mr. Price frequently enjoyed one of the finer things in life… dying.

Most people only do it once, but Mr. Price made a living off of it! You think Sean Bean bit his fair share of dust? Ha! He’s but a  rank amateur compared to Ol’ Vinnie! Bean’s only danced with the Reaper a mere 25 times… Vincent Price has kicked the bucket (of blood) 32 times! And we’re not even counting his Terror-Vision appearances! He’s been drowned, burnt, poisoned, dissolved by acid, and others far too ho-rrible to name here. But, like any great monster, he just came back for the next fright tale! I wouldn’t be shocked if he rose from his real-life grave to start promote the Sears Art Collection!

To show you how to live your death to the fullest… here are…
The Many Deaths of Vincent Price! 

Oh… Spoilers. 😉 xoxo

Rest in Peace, Haruo Nakajima.

Haruo Nakajima was, in more ways than one, the King of the Monsters. From 1954 to 1972, Nakajima was the man behind Godzilla, donning the legendary suit for some of the greatest monster movies of all time. As if one timeless sci-fi icon wasn’t enough, the great Nakajima also portrayed Rodan  Varan, Baragon, Gaira, the larva form of Mothra, and several kaijus in both Ultra Q and Ultraman. Nakajima was a true giant in genre cinema and his creatures will continue to inspire both fright and delight in fright fans for many years to come. Haruo Nakajima was an incredible, unstoppable titan of terror.


Rest in Peace, King of the Monsters. xoxo

#FrankensteinFriday: Frankenstein (1910)

Ho-wdy, Mad Monsters!

We’re going WAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAYY back in time here! I’m talkin’ B.K. (Before Karloff) here! Yessir, this one’s before Caligari had a cabinet and before Chaney’s Phantom haunted the opera. From Edison (Yes, THAT Edison) Studios, it’s Frankenstein!
Now, this short film has been described  as a “liberal” adaptation and, boy, is that true! Instead of stitching corpses together, the bad doctor throws a bunch o’ chemicals into a vat,  resulting in his own Pet Monster. It ain’t the Frankenstein we’re used to, but it’s certainly fascinating! With its strange optical effects, it’s like freaky-deaky magic show! It’s Strange! It’s weird! It’s one of the original horror shows! I highly recommend it to a you cool ghouls and groovy ghoulies out there! 🙂

Check out the OG Frank below:

#TBT, Part DeuXXX: Happy Birthday, Ray Harryhausen!

Happy Birthday to Cinema’s Great Magician, Ray Harryhausen!

 

As you cool ghouls and groovy ghoulies probably know, Ray Harryhausen was the mightiest stop motion animator in the cosmos. He was both Prometheus and Athena, sculpting creatures from clay and breathing life into them. Mr. Harryhausen brought many great monsters into existence with just his skilled hands and superhuman patience. What he did was magic, pure and simple.

In ho-nor of Mr. Harryhausen, we’ve dug up this groovy interview… conducted by Mr. Tim Burton! In it, you’ll hear Ray talk about the birth of several of his creations, watch Tim Burton try not give in to his inner-fanboy, and see the two mess around with a flying saucer from Earth vs. The Flying Saucers! It’s an incredible watch for lovers of fantastic cinema and Master Harryhausen. Enjoy, Kinky Ho-mies! 🙂 xoxo

Happy Birthday, Ray! Thanks for all the cinematic magic. 🙂 xoxo

#TerrorTrailerTuesday: Peter Cushing’s Hammer Frankenstein Films

Ho-wdy, Franken-Freaks! Welcome to #TerrorTrailerTuesday, a new feature on the site on which we eXXXhume the spook-tacular trailers for a cl-ass-sick fright film series, the flicks of a ho-rror icon, or monster movies featuring a certain kind of creature. Today we’re stealing fire from the Gods, desecrating graves, and going to pieces for Peter Cushing’s Dr. Frankenstein!
Is there any mad scientist madder than Peter Cushing’s Frankenstein? This quack dives head-first into depravity and never comes up air! While he has been portrayed in a somewhat heroic light (Evil of Frankenstein, ironically enough), he’s usually the biggest creep in the tomb. Cushing’s brilliant portrayal is both endlessly chilling and weirdly charming, the latter makes his ghastly deeds all the more ho-rrible.

It was a stroke of mad genius on Hammer’s part to make Cushing’s mad doctor the focus of their Frankenstein films, for no ghoul can compare to the great fiend who makes them. And there is no greater fiend than Cushing’s Frankenstein. With Cushing, the doctor was always in… sane. 🙂

Without any further a-boo, here are the trailers for the Cushing Frankenstein films!

Review: American Gods – Season One

Warning: Potential Spoilers Below

Showtime’s American Gods is a leisurely stroll through a dream. It dazzles, delights, and confuses the viewer, but its story unfold at a mummy’s pace. Much of the series involves road trips and I suspect that was the point: the journey is much more fulfilling than the destination.  Every episode is brimming with disturbing beauty and faerie story detours that are fantastical in every meaning of that word, but the primary story often feels like a skeleton to hang such fancies on. It could be said that the story doesn’t even really kick off until its first season finale, and that the entire season was essentially a prelude to what lies ahead.  In that way, it’s easy to see why many would frustrated by the series. For me, it was very much a journey worth taking.

American Gods is based on the Neil Gaiman novel of the same title. It’s an incredibly strange book and I adore it for that reason. Showrunners Bryan Fuller (developer of Hannibal, creator of Pushing Up Daisies) and Michael Green (writer on Alien: Covenant, writer/producer Heroes) are certainly no strangers to bizarre material. What they have crafted is a work that is faithful to the spirit and strangeness of Gaiman’s novel, if not its story. That’s not to say that their series isn’t recognizable as American Gods, but it’s certainly no word-for-word retelling.
For those unfamiliar with the material, the central premise is that gods and mythological creatures exist because people believe in them and immigrants have brought with them their deities and sprites. As humanity’s faith in such beings wanes, New Gods have been born: figures who represent society’s obsession with modern forms media, transportation, technology, and other such concepts. At the center of this world of gods and monsters is Shadow Moon, a recently released convict who has lost everything that matters to him, including his wife. With nothing left, he accepts a job as the bodyguard of an enigmatic conman, known as Mr. Wednesday. In no time at all, Shadow finds himself involved in a conflict between the Old Gods and the New Gods.
The world of American Gods is not far removed from our own in many ways, and completely alien in others. It’s a realm that has everything ours has to offer, but where belief is powerful enough to give life to legends. Anything a person can think of can potentially exist within this world, which gives many opportunities for truly magical imagery. And the series takes full advantage of it. Some of it is gruesome, some of it is weird, and some of it is gorgeous. But all of it is fantastic. In fact, it’s some of the most spectacular imagery I’ve seen for a television show in some time. The cinematography is nothing short of breathtaking, and the visual effects are a magician’s feat.

Like the book, American Gods takes many detours from its main plot. Though it’s easy to see why this would annoy the heck out of some viewers, most of these detours are pretty darn groovy. There’s one episode that’s mostly dedicated to the tale of an 18th-century Irishwoman (Cornish in the book) that really doesn’t further the conflict of the Old Gods and New Gods, but it makes this universe all the richer. When the series pauses to tell short stories, it feels more like an anthology than an epic. I certainly didn’t mind these diversions.

On paper, the cast seems exceptional. In execution, it’s pure perfection. Ricky Whittle’s Shadow and Ian McShane’s Mr. Wednesday play off of each other in marvelous fashion. As far as I’m concerned, McShane is Mr. Wednesday. Gillian Anderson is delightful as Media, wearing the guise of a new pop culture icon in each of her appearances. (Any show that has Dana Scully doing a David Bowie impression is fine by me!! ;)) Orlando Jones is wildly charismatic as the trickster Mr. Nancy and Yetide Badaki’s Bilquis says a lot with very little dialogue. As always, Crispin Glover is sensational as the mysterious Mr. World.

Perhaps the most surprising and delightful aspect of the first season is the inclusion of a new subplot with leprechaun Mad Sweeney and walking corpse Laura Moon, played by Pablo Schreiber and Emily Browning respectively. Both characters have been expanded far beyond their book counterparts. With Sweeney given a longer lifespan and Laura given more personality and backstory than just a dead wife, the pair very nearly steal the entire show away from the main characters. Their insult-laden repartee and unusual chemistry are nothing short of brilliant. If the series has outdone Gaiman in any regard, it’s in the handling of Laura and Sweeney.

All in all, the first season of American Gods is one heck of road trip. If one doesn’t mind frequent stops and detours, the series is superb fantasy. Gaiman’s magnificent novel is done great justice, and even improved upon in some regards. It’s very episodic, but most of its diversions are strong in their own way. We’ll have to wait to see if the second season stays in this direction, but I wouldn’t be disappointed if it did. American Gods is truly divine.