#TerrorTrailerTuesday: The “King of the Silver Scream” Edition

Beep-Beep, Fright Fiends!

2017’s been a real groovy year for The King, hasn’t it?

Mr. Mercedes, The Dark Tower, Gerald’s Game, and IT… no matter where you go, King’s creepin’ up with ya! And with the gargantuan success of IT and the announcement of Suffer the Little Children, it seems like the King renaissance is going to keep on floatin’!
In ho-nor of the man who was Richard Bachman, we’ve gathered up some of the most frightful ‘n’ delighful trailers for some of our favorite King scarefests! Telekinetic creeps, ghosts, things from the grave, killer cars, werewolves, and the Devil himself… these trailers prove that King knows how to show a ghoul a good time! 🙂
Let the trailers begin!!!!!! 

and my personal favorite…

Hail to the King, Baby!

News Bleed: The “IT Conquered the Box Office” Edition

IT breaks all sorts of records and scares up $123 Million! A huge victory for Horror! Variety

Day of the Dead remake rises this year. 🙂 Movie Web

Marilyn Manson’s back, bitches!!! Rolling Stone

Daniel Dae Kim is in talks To replace Ed Skrein in the Hellboy reboot. Comic Book

Swamp Thing co-creator/Wolverine co-creator/Watchmen editor/all-around comic book legend Len Wein has passed away. 🙁 USA Today

R.I.P. Tales from the Crypt makeup artist Donna Henderson. 🙁

Here are two classics Tales eps featuring Ms. Henderson’s Makeup Magic:

#MonsterMovieMonday: Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1920)

Hyde-y Ho, Ho-rror Ho-mies!
Just another Monster Monday here at Kinky Ho-rror, so who’s up for a game of Hyde-and-Shriek…? 😉
Today’s featured creature feature is 1920’s Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, starring John Barrymore as the two-faced fiend. It is one of the earliest (but not THE earliest) adaptation of Robert Louis Stevenson’s cl-Ass-sick terror tale of Good and Evil. For our blood money, the 1931 version is BY FAR the best take on the story. Howl-ever, we think this film doesn’t get enough of the ol’ mad love.
For starters, John Barrymore does a sensational job as the tit-ular fiend(s). His first transformation is done completely without makeup, so it’s just Barrymore contorting his features and violently jerking about, turning himself into a monster through sheer body language… and dam if it ain’t creepy as all heck! When he does get all decked out in fright gear, Barrymore is a thing from Hell!
This gaslight Gothic’s also gotta a lot of dread and menace, with atmos-fear as thick as a London fog. For something creeping up on a hundred years, it’s still got the fright stuff, baby! Our favorite bit is a nightmare sequence with a spider creature that has to be seen to be feared! In silent films, no one can hear you scream!

Nowhere to Hyde… check out the film below!

Sinful: The Churches Edition, Part 1

(Submitted by our beloved Smutmaster Eric, who’s having to deal with Evil Irma’s wrath today…Stay safe, ho-mie. We’re all praying fer ya! Ps- PROM NIGHT II!!!! You rule, Kinky Ho-mie! 🙂 xoxo)

Featuring: Lisa Schrage, Wendy Lyon, Lindsay Lohan, Alicia Rachel Marek, Pirates & Keanu Reeves.

Hello Mary Lou: Prom Night II (1987)


Machete (2010)

The Fog (1980)

John Wick (2014)

#SuperheroSaturday Comic Book Review: Batman/Elmer Fudd Special #1

(Submitted by Batman’s Bitch, Mr. Prince Adam… 😉 Thanks, Super Friend. You know I tease ya cuz I loves ya…and also because it’s true. 😉 xoxo)

“After a chance meeting with billionaire Bruce Wayne, Elmer Fudd’s obsession quickly escalates into stalking Batman through the dark alleys and high-class social settings of Gotham City. Welcome to Bat Season! And the bonus Looney Tunes backup story features DC characters written by Tom King and artwork by Byron Vaughns.” (DC Entertainment)

Batman/Elmer Fudd Special #1 is one of five one shot specials teaming up the DC Comics cast of characters with the Looney Tunes cast of characters.  I love DC & I love Looney Tunes, so these crossovers should be a slam dunk and this issue absolutely is.  How do the two worlds meet?  Well, in the case of this issue, writer Tom King places Elmer Fudd, a hunter on the hunt for a hitman who killed his girlfriend.  The hitman offers to make a trade, spare his life, in exchange for the name of the person who contracted him.  Elmer agree and the hitman tells him the contract was ordered by Bruce Wayne.  Elmer Fudd heads to a party at Wayne Manor and opens fire on Bruce Wayne.  Of course, Bruce escapes, switches his suit for his Batman costume and tracks down Elmer Fudd.  A fight ensues, Batman subdues Elmer Fudd, as he should be able to and convinces him that Bruce Wayne didn’t order the hit on his girlfriend. The two team up and track down the hitman to a bar filled with hitmen and seedy characters. Naturally a bar fight ensues and as they corner the hitman, he pleads and reiterates that he’s not the killer, pointing behind them.  Batman and Elmer turn around, and see Elmer’s girlfriend.  She says that she enlisted the hitman’s help to fake her own death, so she can get away from Elmer Fudd’s dangerous lifestyle as a hunter.  She walks out of the bar, while the three men enjoy a drink to end the first story.  The story is a traditional Gum Shoe detective story, especially with that swerve at the end, with the girlfriend being the mastermind behind it all. Judging by my commentary, you’d assume that Elmer Fudd was randomly dropped into Gotham City, just for crossover purposes.  However, Tom King cleverly works in some Looney Tunes references.  The bar that the hitman frequents is Porky’s, with the owner/bartender being the human version of Porky Pig.   Furthermore, the hitman accused of killing Elmer’s girlfriend is named Bugs “The Bunny” Woves.  The other hitmen and shady characters are made up of Looney Tunes archetypes.  We see versions of Foghorn Leghorn, Yosemite Sam, even Sylvester and Tweety. I liked Tom Kings decision to make Bugs and some of the other Looney Tunes characters villains.  Had they been the exact status quo as their cartoon counterparts, the reader would have a hard time rooting for Batman or Elmer Fudd.  Also the reveal of classic Batman character Silver St. Cloud being Elmer Fudd’s girlfriend, is a fun way to further have Batman/Bruce Wayne cross paths with Elmer Fudd, instead of merely setting the story in Gotham City.  The interesting twist, for the purposes of this book, is that Silver St, Cloud dated Elmer Fudd first before Bruce Wayne, but left them both because of their dangerous lifestyles, highlighting a similarity between the two men.. The ending of this story featuring Batman, Bugs and Elmer drinking carrot juice and discussing Albuquerque is a nice nod to Bugs Bunny’s vegetable of choice, as well as a call back to a classic episode.

While the first story is set in the DC Universe, the backup story is set in Looney Tunes continuity.  It actually reads like a typical Bugs Bunny Vs, Elmer Fudd story.  Mr., Fudd is chasing Bugs because it’s Rabbit, or should we say, Wabbit season. To save his own skin, Bugs switches the sign to Bat Season, lights the Bat-Signal and calls Batman. Seeing the sign, Elmer switches gears and starts chasing Batman. After being thoroughly amused, Bugs Bunny ends up in a Batman costume, throwing Elmer Fudd into a little bit of a confused sate, just like the cartoon.  Also, just like the cartoon, he eventually figures out the ruse and continues chasing Batman.  To outsmart Elmer Fudd, Batman changes the sign to Robin Season, before summoning his various sidekicks who use this moniker.  As Elmer Fudd takes up the chase against the Robin’s, Batman & Elmer Fudd walk off into the sunset.  This book felt like I time travelled about 29 years to a Saturday morning long ago, watching The Bugs Bunny & Tweety Show. In this story, the writer is focused all on the laughs. It’s really a love letter to vintage Looney Tunes episodes. Both these stories show how malleable the Batman and Looney Tunes stories are, that they can tell two stories, with completely different tones and objective and still be recognizable to their brands and be entertaining on two different levels.

Lee Weeks is the artists for the main story.  It definitely has the feel of a gritty, noir detective story to match the story being told.  The art is definitely nowhere near as clean cut or crisp as your typical Batman or Looney Tunes comic book.  It’s got a scruffy look about it. This scruffy look makes Elmer Fudd look like a total badass.  It adds so much gravitas to Elmer Fudd’s trench coach and hat look.  Yet, Mr. Weeks manages to keep Elmer Fudd’s aloof, simplistic look.  I loved the human rendition of the Looney Tunes.  They all have distinguishing characteristics that give the characters away.  For instance Bugs has those protruding teeth he is famous for.  Although, I think they made the human Bugs more visually unappealing, so that we would gravitate towards Elmer.   Yosemite Sam  has his read mustache and beard, but it’s more of a goatee.  Instead of a cowboy hat, he now wears a bandana.  Bartender Porky looks as much like a literal pig as a human drawing could look.  It’s like the pig animation morphed to a human from screen to page.  Foghorn Leghorn has gone from a giant Rooster, to a sharply dressed African American card shark. I loved that there was diversity with some of the characters.  The card shark angle was great as well given that Foghorn Leghorn, in the cartoon often tricks and swindles the hens and the watchdog into getting what he wants.  With all this Elmer Fudd talk, I should mention that there is an exceptional image of Batman leaping down into an alley.  That is an iconic image in Batman lore but done from an angle we’re not used to seeing.  It’s worth noting that Silver St. Cloud is drop dead gorgeous, so it makes sense she could stop both Elmer Fudd and Batman in their tracks at the bar.  The art for the second story is done by Byron Vaughns. There’s not much to say except that it’s great and looks EXACTLY like the animation of Looney Tunes.  It’s so good, that it’s as if they just transposed film cells from the show.  Batman looks like an over exaggerated version of the character from Batman: Brave and the Bold.  The only complaint I have with this portion of the art is that when Bugs Bunny dons a Batman costume, he looks too much like Bat-Mite for my liking.

I expected to like this book but quite frankly, I straight up loved it!  It satisfies both fandoms with a story set in both the DC Universe and Looney Tunes lore.  If you’re a fan of both, this is your fanboy heaven. I can guarantee I will be reading and reviewing the remaining four one shots in this series.  Whether you go looney or batty over this book, I guarantee you are going to love it! So BUY IT and read it.  Until next time…. That’s All Folks!

IT (2017) Movie Review

(Submitted by our own Mr. Anton Phibes…Thanks, Ho-rror Ho-mie! 🙂 xoxo)

To say that expectations were high for 2017’s IT would be a grotesque understatement. Based on the best-selling Stephen King novel, the film is the second adaptation of the material, following the much beloved miniseries. Before even a single frame of this latest version came to be, a thunderous jolt of anticipation struck film-goers like a circus locomotive. Thousands of think pieces, fan art, and parodies sprouted up when the very first image of “IT” was released, and that goes doubly so for the trailer. IT was a bonafide cultural phenomena before it was projected on a single screen. Living up to such monstrous adaptations seems impossible, but does IT succeed?  With a big grease-painted grin, I’m very pleased to report that IT is every bit the monsterpiece we had hoped for.

Stephen King’s novel is a massive work of fiction told through narratives alternating between two timelines, so the film wisely adapts the half of the novel that focuses on the seven protagonists as kids. The film advances the setting from the 1950s to the late ’80s, but still maintains much of the source material. In the movie, Bill (Jaeden Lieberher), Beverly (Sophia Lillis), Richie (Stranger Things’ Finn Wolfhard), Eddie (Jack Dylan Grazer), Ben (Jeremy Ray Taylor), Mike (Chosen Jacobs) and Stan (Wyatt Oleff) are all social outcasts in their own way. United by their misfit status, they develop a tight-knit relationship and dub themselves the “Losers’ Club”. When a malevolent shape-shifting killer targets them, the unconventional heroes must conquer their fears to conquer “IT”.
IT is a lot like King’s Stand By Me, but with an eldritch abomination creeping about. It’s almost as much a coming-of-age story as it is a monster movie. Sure, the clown is a fright to behold, but the children are undeniably the heart of the story.  Their struggles, their quirks, and their interactions feel so very real that it’s easy to forget that these are actors reading from a script. They are the kind of “geeky” kids you may have known (or been) growing up, with all the flaws and idiosyncrasies that come with such children. All are incredibly lovable, making the horror (both otherworldly and mundane) that befalls them unbearable. Both their chemistry and individual charms are what elevate this film to greatness and achieve the impressive feat of making a film about a child-eating clown monster heartwarming.

Of course, even with an exceptional group of heroes, a monster movie still needs a credible monster… oh boy! does It succeed in that regard! Actor Bill Skarsgard had some big floppy shoes to fill after Tim Curry’s turn in the miniseries, but he works sorcery here as Pennywise, the clown form of “IT”.  Pennywise’s initial appearances in this film are almost inviting, but there’s always that sense that he’s plotting… and hungry. Even in his most clownishly charming moments, he can barely conceal his ghastly appetite. As the film progresses, Pennywise grows more and more demonic in a truly unsettling fashion. It’s the stuff of nightmares.


There’s been a lot of talk about whether or not the new “IT” is superior to the old one.The way I see it, Tim Curry and Bill Skarsgard are to Pennywise what Bela Lugosi and Christopher Lee are to Dracula: two unique actors giving equally brilliant performances as the same monster. Bill Skarsgard’s interpretation is considerably different than Curry’s, but still magnificent in its own way. Curry was pretty darn funny as the hellish harlequin, giving him a comedic edge that makes his more violent moments genuinely shocking. Skarsgard had a more overtly diabolical quality that is still  quite effective. Regardless of which performance you prefer, I think most of us can agree that Bill Skarsgard is a worthy “IT” for a new generation. Bravo to both clowns!

Despite its cast of children, IT is a fairly disturbing movie with some wonderfully nasty bits. Some of the most beautifully wicked scares you’ll see in a big budget fright film are lurking in this film. From the gory to the surreal, there’s a shock here for every taste. There are even some scenes that have an old-fashioned Gothic flavor to them, most of which take place in what is perhaps the best “haunted house” set I’ve seen in years. If you like a wide variety of creepy things, IT’s the spook show for you.

With an already killer box office intake and fabulous reviews, there’s little doubt that a sequel based on the novel’s second half is on its way. In fact, there’s one teased at the very end of the film. While I’ll certainly miss the child actors, I have no doubt that the next one will be another sensational work of horror cinema. I look forward to seeing Pennywise dance again. As for this current installment, stop clowning around and see it as soon as you can! Beep Beep!

Splatterday Mourning Cartoons: Jeffrey Combs – Man of 1,000 Voices

A very Happy Birthday to the Re-Animator himself, Mr. Jeffrey Combs!

There’s no earthly way to express how much I freakin’ ADORE Mr. Jeffrey Combs!!!!!!!! He’s been in phenomenal fright films, has made many Star Trek appearances, played Doctor Strange (Doctor Mordrid counts!), and is always just the screamiest, dreamiest weirdo in anything he graces! *swooooooooooooooon* 🙂

In addition to being beyond seXXXy, Jeffrey Combs is to Lovecraftian sin-ema what Vincent Price is to Poe. He’s been named “the first Lovecraftian actor” for his frequent appearances in Lovecraft adaptations, even playing the cosmic ho-rror author a few times. Of corpse, of all his great HPL roles, his best and most iconic will always be his masterfully insane performance as Dr. Herbert West in the Re-Animator films. With his insane intensity and wicked wit, Dr. West is easily one of the greatest mad doctors to ever mess with the natural order.

One asss-pect of Mr. Combs that doesn’t seem to get a lot of attention is his career as a voice actor. Starting with his freaky-deaky turn as The Scarecrow in The New Batman Adventures, Mr. Combs has done his fair share of voice work for cartoons and video games. While he mostly does the spooky stuff in live-action, Mr. Combs tends to lend his voice to superheroes and supervillains. His wonderous work includes Question in Justice League Unlimited, Kite Man in Batman: The Brave and the Bold, The Leader in The Avengers: Earth’s Mightiest Heroes, Brainiac in Injustice 2, and Ratchet in Transformers: Prime. Way to speak out, Mr. Combs! 🙂

As a testament to his greatness and in observance of Splatterday Mourning, we’ve eXXXhumed some of the epically epic voice work of Jeffrey Combs! First, a video showcasing his many cartoon appearances…

…and a full episode of Scooby-Doo: Mystery Incorporated featuring Mr. Combs as H.P. Love… er, Hatecraft! What better way to ho-nor Combs than with his portrayal of the man who made him a fright icon? 🙂


Scooby-Doo! Mystery Incorporated S01E12… by cgssthd

Happy Birthday, Jeffrey Combs! Stay SeXXXy! 😉

#TBT: The “Happy Birthday, Dario Argento” Edition

Happy Birthday to that maestro of Italian ho-rror, Dario Argento!

From his very first picture back in 1970, Signor Argento has been haunting our collective nightmares with some of the most maddeningly beautiful ho-rror films in the world. I mean, the dude puts the “gore” in “gore-geous”! With jaw-dropping camera work, fabulous visuals, and his frequent use of startling colors,  Dario Argento brings a painterly beauty to the canvas of cinema. Among his masterworks are Deep Red, site favorite SuspiriaPhenomena with Jennifer Connelly, and 1987’s Opera.


In ho-nor of this mad artist’s birthaversary, we dug up this groovy documentary on the man. It features interviews with ho-rror legends, including John Carpenter, Alice Cooper, and Jessica Harper. Enjoy, Kreeps! 🙂

Happy Birthday, Dario! Stay scary! 🙂

#WerewolfWednesday: The Mad Monster (1942)

Howl-dy, hairy fiends!

Give it up for the Wolfman, boils and ghouls, ’cause it’s another wild ‘n’ dangerous #WerewolfWednesday!

For today’s loony lunar lark, we’ve got a cl-Ass-Sick howler from 1942, it’s The Mad Monster!

No! Not Mad Monster Party! The Mad Monster! Sheesh! Good minions are so hard to find these days! 😉


The Mad Monster is a groovy poverty row chiller-diller made by PRC to capitalize on the success of The Wolf Man. It stars the great George Zucco and Glenn Strange, years before his Frankenstein met Abbott and Costello. The plot concerns a mad scientist (‘natch) who develops a formula that turns his simple-minded gardener into a hideous werewolf… Yikes! That’s the only time a hair growth formula has worked TOO well!

George Zucco’s at his most marvelously mad here, serving up more tasty ham than a Christmas dinner. Glenn Strange is great in a turn that brings to mind Lon Chaney Jr. in both The Wolf Man and Of Mice and Men. On top of those wonderful performances, the film also has plenty o’ cl-Ass-ical frights ‘n’ delights to satisfy all you old-school ho-rror ho-unds out there. 🙂

Do you dare face the ho-rror of… The Mad Monster?!

News Bleed: The “Insidious Scream of the Snowman” Edition

Is the director of IT sinking his teeth into Dracula? Bloody Disgusting

A mysterious new Michael Jackson album called Scream is heading our way… and it looks like it might be spooky. 🙂 Variety

William “The Exorcist” Friedkin just filmed a REAL exorcism! IndieWire

Gary Oldman returns to supernatural terror with Mary. 🙂 Hollywood Reporter

The new trailer for The Snowman is chilling. Empire

The trailer for the latest Insidious is here to scare us! 🙂 io9